Monday, February 25, 2008

Zoho


Vembu has a very exciting opportunity ahead of him. What the Chinese have done in manufacturing, he is showing that the Indians can do in software: undercut U.S. and European software makers dramatically. Not in information technology services. Not by body shopping. Vembu has done something few Indian entrepreneurs have been able to achieve--build a true "product" company out of India. This is not a head count-based business model.

And here's something that's seriously interesting:

"We hire young professionals whom others disregard," Vembu says. "We don't look at colleges, degrees or grades. Not everyone in India comes from a socio-economic background to get the opportunity to go to a top-ranking engineering school, but many are really smart regardless.

"We even go to poor high schools, and hire those kids who are bright but are not going to college due to pressure to start making money right away," Vembu continues. "They need to support their families. We train them, and in nine months, they produce at the level of college grads. Their resumes are not as marketable, but I tell you, these kids can code just as well as the rest. Often, better."

This impressive story is here; written by Sramana Mitra, it originally appeared in Forbes.com.

Thanks to this proud employee for the pointer.

3 Comments:

  1. Rahul said...

    Impressive, and if more companies catch on to the fact that there's lots of real talent out there which never makes it through our educational system, this could change things.

    But the company's webpage looks like a ripoff of Google. They need to change that...

  2. Jillu Madrasi said...

    forbes and then rediff. wonder why...

  3. Abi said...

    Rahul: Their Zoho range has received much better reviews than the corresponding Google product has; given this, their website could certainly be far better than its Google-ish appearance. Yes, I agree: their website could do with some improvement.

    J.Madrasi: Rediff (like many other Indian media outlets) re-publishes stuff from other places. I guess this is also one of those articles obtained through the syndication route ...