Thursday, December 27, 2007

Red tape in India's higher ed system


Academicians point out that the only ones getting into the education sector are those who can circumvent archaic rules through political connections or the ones who have enough capital to pay for clearances. [...]

Clearly, the multiplicity of governing agencies at the local, state and central level forces institutions to go through a maze of bureaucratic and time-consuming procedures. In Maharashtra, for instance, to start a B-school, an institute first needs a no-objection certificate from the government. Then it needs to apply to AICTE for recognition and then a local university for affiliation. For funds, the institute needs to send an application to University Grants Commission (UGC) and for accreditation (not mandatory) to NAAC (National Assessment and Accreditation Council). And finally, the college needs to send its approval letters and brochures to the state government's admission committee and fee fixation committee, the Pravesh Niyantran Samiti and Shikshan Shulka Samiti.

That's from this report by Hemali Chhapia of ToI.

3 Comments:

  1. Unknown Indian said...

    Our higher education system really needs unshackling. Have posted on this issue - particularly how the AICTE has prevented Indian residents from accessing the CFA Program - on my blog

  2. Blue said...

    Unrelated -- but love the revamp! Have I met the young person in the picture?

  3. vinay vishwas said...

    hey dude, I too wrote more or less on the same lines about our education system , for me quality at each & every level matters than red tapism !! but having said that, Red tapism is indeed very rampant in India ....