Wednesday, July 13, 2005

Today's news on education


Economic Times has a report about the ongoing tussle in the Central Government about what to do -- and how to do it -- with the education cess, which has collected about Rs. 5,000 crores (Rs. 50 billion). The players are Arjun Singh (HRD Ministry), Chidambaram (Finance Ministry) and Montek Singh Ahluwalia (Planning Commission).

ToI presents a view and a counterview on the issue of making students pay an exit fee on graduation. You might also want to check out the posts on this topic by Satya and Reuben

In the meantime, CABE has articulated a strange view that not more than 20 % of the resources of a college/university should be recovered from the students through fees.

ET has another article about the collaborative arrangements between Indian institutions and foreign ones; it points out that the regulations on this issue are still being prepared.

If this post looks and feels like a link dump, it is! Since I think there is some important information in these reports, I have collected them here simply for quick and easy access. As I have stated so many times before, the Indiatimes website is an absolutely horrible, messy maze; it is difficult to find things there. For example, there was a report about a company called 3D Solid Compression in the ET two days ago; I could not find an online link to it!

1 Comments:

  1. Satya said...

    Top ranking universities in the America (both state and private) typically recover just about 20% of their income from tuition fees (see my recent post on the sources of income of American universities at http://prayatna.typepad.com/education/2005/07/what_are_the_so.html) . Maybe the CABE chairman, Bhalchandra Mungeker, is using this as the benchmark.

    But American universities tend to raise a big chunk of revenues through aggresive fund raising drives in the form of donations and also by providing services and charging for it, which are both unknown at our universities .

    I wonder where Bhalachandra Mungekar thinks the rest of the money ought to come from.